List of Australian Plants to Look for Leaf Miners On

Last updated: 22th August, 2022

As part of my research, I’m interested in collecting fresh leaf miners. Below is a list of host plants for which I’m particularly interested in getting material from. If you see a leaf mine on these plants, you can upload the record to the Australian Leaf Miners iNaturalist project or directly email me (email at the bottom).

I have listed them by state/territory, plant family and time of year that the mine has been recorded.

You may find similar mines on related plant families, and you may find mines at different times of the year, or even in a different state. I hope this list just gives you an idea of target plants I’m looking for.

If possible, I will also link to an example of what the mine may look like. Unfortunately sometimes all that’s in the literature is the name of the host plant, so I may not be able to provide an image of what the mine looks like (which may be why I’m interested in the plant in the first place!).

This page is constantly updated, and if the plant is listed here it means I am still interested in that plant.

If you have observed any leaf mines on the below host plants, please send me an email at ying.luo@csiro.au. If you have permission to collect from that area and are willing to send me some samples, I can also reimburse you for postage. Do get in touch. 🙂

Victoria

Malvaceae
Gynatrix pulchella – (September) – Tentiform mines that look like this

New South Wales/Australian Capital Territory

Eupomatiaceae
Eupomatia laurina – (July) – Serpentine mines that look like this

Fabaceae
Hardenbergia violacea– (March) – Blotch mines that look like this
Kennedia nigricans, K. prostrata – (September) – Underside blotch mines, may have multiple larvae inside

Malvaceae
Gynatrix pulchella – (September) – Tentiform mines that look like this
Palmeria scandens – (June) – Tortuous mine

Monimiaceae
Wilkiea hugeliana, W. macrophylla – (February, September) – Mines that look like this

Myrtaceae
Syzygium smithii – (November) – Mine-galls that look like this


Rhamnaceae
Pomaderris cinerea – (November)

Rutaceae
Acronychia imperforata – (March, June) – Mine-galls that look like this

Vitaceae
Cissus antarctica – (June) – Serpentine mines that look like this

Queensland

Eupomatiaceae
Eupomatia laurina – (July) – Serpentine mines that look like this

Fabaceae
Millettia pinnata – (Jan – March) – Blotch mines like this, or

Malvaceae
Hibiscus sp.
Sida subspicata
Malvastrum americanum – (August) – Tentiform mines that look like this

Meliaceae
Dysoxylum fraserianum

Monimiaceae
Wilkiea hugeliana, W. macrophylla – (February, September) – Mines that look like this

Oleaceae
Jasminium simplicifolium – (December)

Primulaceae
Aegiceras corniculatum – Serpentine mines that look like this

Proteaceae
Stenocarpus salignus
Stenocarpus sinatus


Rutaceae
Acronychia imperforata – (March, June) – Mine-galls that look like this

Verbeceae
Avicennia marina – (December) – Potentially serpentine mines

Vitaceae
Cissus antarctica – (June) – Serpentine mines that look like this

Western Australia

Fabaceae
Kennedia prostrata – (September) – Underside blotch mines, may have multiple larvae inside
Glycine romanosa – (April)

Rhamnaceae
Trymalium sp. – (October)

South Australia

Fabaceae
Hardenbergia violacea– (March) – Blotch mines that look like this
Kennedia nigricans, K. prostrata – (September) – Underside blotch mines, may have multiple larvae inside

Northern Territory

Fabaceae
Millettia pinnata – (Jan – March) – Blotch mines like this or this